Home BOP Cities Fishing Geography History Images Links Maps Nature POW Realty Sailing Tourism Weather Site Map Search


National Park Service
Department of the Interior
Washington, DC 20013-7127

HISTORIC AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD

Sierra Army Depot


Adjacent to Honey Lake in Lassen County, California, midway between Reno, Nevada and Susanville, California.

Date of Construction: Established in 1942 Owner: Department of the Army

Significance : One of several such sites established during World War II, Sierra Army Depot continues its original function of ammunition and combat equipment storage.

Historical Report Prepared by: Melvyn Green, Christy Johnson McAvoy and Barbara Hightower, 1984.

Prepared for Transmittal by: Robie S. Lange, HABS/HAER, 1985. Sierra Army Depot

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Sierra Army Depot is located on 36,322 acres adjacent to Honey Lake in Lassen County, California, midway between Reno, Nevada and Susanville, California. Part of the U.S. Army Depot System Command, the installation stores ammunition, special weapons material, and general supplies. An ammunition maintenance operation, facilities for weapons disposal, and an airfield are also on the site. The installation has 1,192 structures; most are ammunition storage igloos and warehouses constructed during World War II. Replacement housing and special weapons facilities were erected since that time. There are no Category I, II, or III historic properties at Sierra Army Depot.

CONTENTS

Executive Summary

PREFACE

1. INTRODUCTION 3

Scope 3

Methodology 4

2. HISTORICAL OVERVIEW 12

Background 12

Pre-Military Land Use 12

Site Selection and World War II Construction 14

Post-War Construction 21

3. PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATIONS 27

Background 27
Category I Historic Properties 32
Category II Historic Properties 32
Category III Historic Properties 32

BIBLIOGRAPHY 34

Appendix A A-1

PREFACE

This report presents the results of an historic properties survey of Sierra Army Depot. Prepared for the United States Army Materiel Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM), the report is intended to assist the Army in bringing this installation into compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and its amendments, and related federal laws and regulations. To this end, the report focuses on the identification, evaluation, documentation, nomination, and preservation of historic properties at Sierra Army Depot.

Chapter 1 sets forth the survey 5 scope and methodology;
Chapter 2 presents an architectural, historical, and technological overview of the installation and its properties; and
Chapter 3 identifies significant properties by Army category and sets forth preservation recommendations.
Illustrations and an annotated bibliography supplement the text.

This report is part of a program initiated through a memorandum of agreement between the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Department of the Army. The program covers 74 DARCOM installations and has two components: 1) a survey of historic properties (districts, buildings, structures, and objects), and 2) the development of archeological overviews. Stanley H. Fried, Chief, Real Estate Branch of Headquarters DARCOM, directed the program for the Army, and Dr. Robert J. Kapsch, Chief of the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record (HABSIHAER) directed the program for the National Park Service. Sally Kress Tompkins was program manager, and Robie S. Lange was project manager for the historic properties survey. Technical assistance was provided by Donald C. Jackson.

Building Technology Incorporated acted as primary contractor to HABS/HAER for the historic properties survey. William A. Brenner was BTI's principal-in-charge and Dr. Larry D. Lankton was the chief technical consultant. Major subcontractors were the MacDonald and Mack Partnership and Melvyn Green and Associates. The authors of this report were Melvyn Green, Christy Johnson McAvoy, and Barbara Hightower. The authors gratefully acknowledge the help of the base Environmental Officer Fred Lockley, the Facilities Engineering staff, Melba Ayres, and Tim Purdy of the Lassen County Historical Society.

The complete HABS/HAER documentation for this installation will be included in the HABS/HAER collections at the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, under the designation

Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION

SCOPE

This report is based on an historic properties survey conducted in 1983 of all accessible Army-owned properties located within the official boundaries of Sierra Army Depot. The survey included the following tasks:

Also completed as a part of the historic properties survey of the installation, but not included in this report, are HABS/HAER Inventory cards for 49 individual properties. These cards, which constitute HABS/HAER Documentation Level IV, will be provided to the Department of the Army. Archival copies of the cards, with their accompanying photographic negatives, will be transmitted to the HABSIHAER collections at the Library of Congress.

The methodology used to complete these tasks is described below.

METHODOLOGY

1. Documentary Research

Research was conducted at Sierra Army Depot, the Lassen County Public Library, and the Lassen County Historical Society in Susanville, California. The California State Historic Preservation Office was contacted regarding the existence of historic properties on the site, but none were identified through this source.

Army records used for the field inventory included Real Property Inventory printouts that listed all officially recorded buildings and structures by facility classification and date of construction; installation property record cards; drawings, maps, and aerial photographs supplied by Facilities Engineering staff; and installation planning, historical, and environmental reports. A complete listing of documents may be found in the bibliography.

2. Field Inventory

The field inventory was conducted by Christy Johnson McAvoy during June 1983. Assistance was provided by Fred Lockley, the base Environmental Officer, and the Facilities Engineering staff, including Andy Reiss and Isabell Seredge. Additional information was provided by depot employee Melba Ayres, and Tim Purdy, president of the Lassen County Historical Society.

Field inventory procedures were based on the HABS/HAER Guidelines for Inventories of Historic Buildings and Engineering and Industrial

Structures. All areas and properties were visually surveyed with the following exceptions: special weapons areas and areas adjacent; ordnance storage tanks and Building 211, due to road closure and construction (see Appendix A). Building locations and approximate dates of construction were noted from the installation's property records and field-verified.

Field inventory forms were prepared for, and black and white 35 mm photographs taken of all buildings and structures through 1945 except basic utilitarian structures of no architectural, historical, or technological interest. When groups of similar ("prototypical") buildings were found, one field form was normally prepared to represent all buildings of that type. Field inventory forms were also completed for representative post-1945 buildings and structures. Information collected on the field forms was later evaluated, condensed, and transferred to HABS/HAER Inventory cards.

3. Historic Overview

A combined architectural, historical, and technological overview was prepared from information developed from the documentary research and the field inventory. It was written in two parts: 1) an introductory description of the installation, and 2) a history of the installation by periods of development, beginning with pre-military land uses. Maps and photographs were selected to supplement the text as appropriate.

The objectives of the overview were to 1) establish the periods of major construction at the installation, 2) identify important events and individuals associated with specific historic properties, 3) describe patterns and locations of historic property types, and 4) analyze specific building and industrial technologies employed at the installation.

4. Property Evaluation and Preservation Measures

Based on information developed in the historical overviews, properties were first evaluated for historical significance in accordance with the eligibility criteria for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. These criteria require that eligible properties possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association, and that they meet one or more of the following:

A. Are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history.
B. Are associated with the lives of persons significant in the nation 5 past.
C. Embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, represent the work of a master, possess high artistic values, or represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction.
D. Have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in pre-history or history. Properties thus evaluated were further assessed for placement in one of five Army historic property categories as described in Army Regulation 420-40: (4)

Based on an extensive review of the architectural, historical, and technological resources identified on DARCOM installations nationwide, four criteria were developed to help determine the appropriate categorization level for each Army property. These criteria were used to assess the importance not only of properties of traditional historical interest, but of the vast number of standardized or prototypical buildings, structures, and production processes that were built and put into service during World War II, as well as of properties associated with many post-war technological achievements. The four criteria were often used in combination and are as follows:

1) Degree of importance as a work of architectural, engineering, or industrial design. This criterion took into account the qualitative factors by which design is normally judged: artistic merit, workmanship, appropriate use of materials, and functionality.

2) Degree of rarity as a remaining example of a once widely used architectural, engineering, or industrial design or process. This criterion was applied primarily to the many standardized or prototypical DARCOM buildings, structures, or industrial processes. The more widespread or influential the design or process, the greater the importance of the remaining examples of the design or process was considered to be. This criterion was also used for non-military structures such as farmhouses and other once prevalent building types.

3) Degree of integrity or completeness. This criterion compared the current condition, appearance, and function of a building, structure, architectural assemblage, or industrial process to its original or most historically important condition, appearance, and function. Those properties that were highly intact were generally considered of greater importance than those that were not.

4) Degree of association with an important person, program, or event. This criterion was used to examine the relationship of a property to a famous personage, wartime project, or similar factor that lent the property special importance.

The majority of DARCOM properties were built just prior to or during World War II, and special attention was given to their evaluation. Those that still remain do not often possess individual importance, but collectively they represent the remnants of a vast construction undertaking whose architectural, historical, and technological importance needed to be assessed before their numbers diminished further. This assessment centered on an extensive review of the military construction of the 1940-1945 period, and its contribution to the history of World War II and the post-war Army landscape.

Because technology has advanced so rapidly since the war, post-World War II properties were also given attention. These properties were evaluated in terms of the nation's more recent accomplishments in weaponry, rocketry, electronics, and related technological and scientific endeavors. Thus the traditional definition of a property 5O or more years old was not germane in the assessment of either World War II or post-war DARCOM buildings and structures; rather, the historic importance of all properties was evaluated as completely as possible regardless of age.

Property designations by category are expected to be useful for approximately ten years, after which all categorizations should be reviewed and updated.


Following this categorization procedure, Category I, II, and III historic properties were analyzed in terms of.

Based on the above considerations, the general preservation recommendations presented in Chapter 3 for Category I, II and III historic properties were developed. Special preservation recommendations were created for individual properties as circumstances required.

5. Report Review

Prior to being completed in final form, this report was subjected to an in-house review by Building Technology Incorporated. It was then sent in draft to the subject installation for comment and clearance and, with its associated historical materials, to HABS/HAER staff for technical review. When the installation cleared the report, additional draft copies were sent to DARCOM, the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officer, and, when requested, to the archeological contractor performing parallel work at the installation. The report was revised based on all comments collected, then published in final form.

NOTES

1. Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service, Guidelines for Inventories of Historic Buildings and Engineering and Industrial Structures (unpublished draft, 1982).

2. Representative post-World War II buildings and structures were defined as properties that were: (a) "representative" by virtue of construction type, architectural type, function, or a combination of these, (b) of obvious Category I, II, or III historic importance, or (c) prominent on the installation by virtue of size, location, or other distinctive feature.

3. National Park Service, How to Complete National Register Forms (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, January 1977).

4. Army Regulation 420-40, Historic Preservation (Headquarters, U.S. Army: Washington, D.C., 15 April 1984).

Chapter 2 . HISTORICAL OVERVIEW BACKGROUND


Sierra Army Depot is located on 36,322 acres adjacent to Honey Lake in Lassen County, California, midway between Reno, Nevada and Susanville California. Part of the U.S. Army Depot System Command, the installation stores ammunition, special weapons materials, and general supplies. An ammunition maintenance operation, facilities for weapons disposal, and an airfield are also located on the site.

Illustration 1 Site plan, Sierra Army Depot. The Army town of Herlong is at the extreme right.

(Source: Installation Activity Brochure, Sierra Army Depot, 1977)


The depot site was acquired in early 1942, and construction began immediately thereafter. Ammunition and combat equipment storage, administration, utility, and maintenance facilities were largely completed by early 1943, and the town of Herlong was constructed at the south end of the site between 1942 and 1944 to house depot personnel. By war S end, 1,021 of the installation s present 1,192 buildings had been constructed. Following the war, storage, special weapons, missile surveillance, and ammunition maintenance facilities were added, and the depot's obsolete housing and community facilities were either upgraded or demolished and replaced.

Pre-Military LAND USE

Prior to Army acquisition in 1942, the semi-desert site was virtually uninhabited and was used primarily as rangeland. In 1933, the Army purchased 60,523 acres at the Sierra site (which included Honey Lake), but did not proceed with construction due to a lack of funding. Earlier, a succession of small towns (Liegen, Rayl, and Hackstaff) were established at a point along the Nevada-California-Oregon narrow gauge railroad at the southern end of the depot, but none of these attracted a sizeable or stable population. Hackstaff, the last of these settlements, disappeared shortly after construction of the depot.

No pre-military structures from these towns remain on the site.

SITE SELECTION AND WORLD WAR II CONSTRUCTION

Increased Congressional appropriations for defense brought about by the fall of France in 1940 led to the expansion of ammunition storage facilities across the United States. Initial plans called for placing depots in the four corners of the country to support forces repelling attacks from any direction. With increased ammunition production and implementation of the lend-lease program, the need for additional supply depots soon became apparent. Appropriations during the summer of 1941 made possible the construction of a major storage facility on the west coast. In February 1942, the Army leased 16,283 acres adjacent to the Honey Lake property. The expanded site met the Ordnance Department's basic criteria for the location of storage depots: it was a reasonably safe distance from the coast, thus lessening the danger of attack, yet was close enough to western military posts and ports to facilitate shipment of supplies; the area was sparsely settled, decreasing the chance of damage in the event of an ammunition explosion; the dry climate was ideal for ammunition storage; and major rail lines bordered the site on the north (Southern Pacific) and south (Western Pacific).2

Work began immediately after lease of the site. The construction contract was awarded to Bressi-Brevanda and Teichert, who focused their immediate efforts on the erection of ammunition storage igloos, magazines, and administration facilities. These were largely completed, along with a housing area, by early 1943. Construction continued through the end of the year with the addition of a 72-bed hospital and the Amedee Airstrip at the northwest corner of the depot.3

Ammunition Storage Area

The majority of buildings on the depot are located in the ammunition storage area where 802 igloos were constructed in 1942. These barrel vaulted structures of reinforced concrete are 26-1/2 feet wide and either 60 or 50 feet long. The earth covered igloos are arranged in blocks of no more than 100 and are spaced at least 400 feet apart. Ten concrete "safehouses," are interspersed in each block to provide shelter for personnel in the event of an explosion. Since the igloos were completed before rail lines had been extended into the storage area, a makeshift system consisting of borrowed track and a steam engine was initially used to move ammunition into the depot in early 1943.

Additional facilities were constructed in the area in 1942 to facilitate the movement, storage, and care of ammunition. These include two wood-frame structures used as a field office (Building 400) and a less-than-carload building (Building 403), an inspectors workshop built of brick and clay tile Building 401). and eight brick dunnage/equipment buildings (Buildings 423, 437, 449, 489, 498, 509, 528, and 533). Eleven standard above-ground magazines (Buildings 426-430 and 438-443), built of brick and hollow clay tile, were also erected in the ammunition storage area west of the igloo blocks.

Illustration 2 Building A1001. Ammunition storage "igloos" comprise the majority of structures at Sierra Army Depot. Representative of these is A1001, with its single steel door entry. (Source: Field inventory photograph, Christy Johnson McAvoy Melvyn Green & Associates, 1983)


Illustration 3 Building 26. This hollow clay tile structure is one of 11 standard above-ground magazines erected in the ammunition storage area in 1942. (Source: Field inventory photograph Christy Johnson McAvoy, Melvyn Green & Associates, 1983)

Administration and Housing Area

This area, developed in 1942-43 at the southeast corner of the depot, consists of administration, housing, utility, maintenance, and storage facilities. These include the headquarters building (Building 1), fire station (Building 2), personnel processing (Building 7), BOQ (Building 26), officers' family quarters (Buildings 21-25 and 28-30), communication center (Building 51), two motor repair shops (Buildings 53 and 55), a locomotive storage building (Building 61), heating plant (Building 76), paint shop (Building 63), a storehouse (Building 74), Signal Corps office (Building 75), and three inert materials warehouses (Buildings 58-60). Like many structures erected in administration areas on other supply depots after the spring of 1942, when permanent construction materials were in critical supply, most of these are of temporary, wood-frame "mobilization" type construction.5

(Illustration 4) Building 1, west elevation. This two-story wood-frame structure built in 1942 serves as administrative headquarters for Sierra Army Depot.

To rectify the lack of adequate housing for depot workers, the town of Herlong was built south of Susanville Road between 1942 and 1944. During the war years, the town consisted of community facilities and over 1,000 units of housing; the majority of these wood-frame structures have since been sold and relocated. Remaining are six two-story wooden barracks (Buildings 1201-1204, 1208, and 1214), troop administration, mess, and club facilities (Buildings 1223, 1217, and 1218), a bowling alley (Building 1019), a church (Building. 1010), two community centers (Buildings 2067 and 2068), a general store (Building 2069), and a theater (Building 2071).

(Illustration 5) Building 2068. This wood-frame structure is one of two community buildings in the town of Herlong built at the south end of the depot in 1942-1944. Herlong provides most services for military and civilian personnel on post.

Combat Supply Storage Area

The depot's mission was expanded shortly after construction began when the Ordnance Department decided to store combat equipment at 12 of the new ammunition supply depots. Construction of additional warehouses was authorized in 1942, and by the end of the year Sierra's square footage of combat equipment warehouse space was greater than that of ammunition storage.6 The majority of the warehouses (Buildings 301-311 and 351-366) erected in the area by Stolte and Company, Inc. are of wood-frame construction, as are the area's administration building (Building 201) and fire station (Building 203). Three additional warehouses (Building 208-210) are prefabricated metal structures with clerestories, and four single-story buildings originally used for packaging and processing supplies (Buildings 205-207 and 211) are built of brick.

(Illustrations 6) Building 363. This wood-frame structure is one of a group of warehouses built in 1942 for the storage of combat supplies.

(Illustrations 7) Buildings 208, 209, and 210. These three warhouses built in the combat supply storage area are prefabricated metal structures.

POST-WAR CONSTRUCTION

Although the work load at Sierra reached an all time high during the Korean War, little construction took place before the mid-1960s. A tank farm containing 47 circular steel structures used as controlled humidity warehouses (Buildings 600-626 and 650-669) was erected in 1946. New missions required a special weapons building (Building 599), built in 1956 and enlarged in 1969. In 1966, a guided missile surveillance facility (Building 541) was erected, followed in 1968 by an ammunition maintenance complex (Buildings 634-641). An additional special weapons area (Buildings 670-672) was constructed in 1979 and 1980.

During the 1970s, the depot's obsolete housing and community facilities were upgraded. World War II family and troop housing in the Herlong area was dismantled and sold, and 40 remaining units of Wherry Housing, constructed in 1953, were sold. Three barracks (Buildings 166-168) were erected in 1976. An area of one-story duplexes (Buildings 176-182) was added north of the officer housing in the administration area in 1975 (Buildings 176-182), and 40 units of family housing (Buildings 1101, 1102, 1104-1110, and 1111-1120) were constructed south of the primary school in the same year. A medical facility (Building 150) was erected in 1975, replacing an inadequate World War II hospital complex, and in 1976 an interdenominational Post Chapel Center (Building 170) opened.

(Illustration 8) Building 166. This two-story structure with steeply pitched gabled roofs is one of the three enlisted barracks buildings erected on the depot in 1976.

NOTES

1. Ammunition explosions that seriously damaged the Navy's Lake Denmark Powder Depot and the Army's nearby Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey in 1926 prompted the Navy to consider the Sierra site for an ammunition storage depot, but it eventually built at Hawthorne, Nevada instead. Jo Iland, "Sierra Army Depot, Herlong, California" (Susanville, California: Lassen County Historical Society, 1966), pp. 1-2; Facilities Engineering, Analysis of Existing Facilities (Sierra Army Depot, 1972), p. II-1. Much of the acreage acquired in 1933 was excessed in 1981.

2. Harry C. Thomson and Lida Mayo, The Ordnance Department: Procurement and Supply (Washington, D.C.: Office of the Chief of Military History, 1960), pp. 363-374; Iland, "Sierra Army Depot, Herlong California," p. 1.

a. Iland, "Sierra Army Depot, Herlong California," pp. 3 and 13-15.

4. Thomson and Mayo note that the igloo type of magazine had been preferred by the Joint Army-Navy Ammunition Storage Board and the Ordnance Safety Board for all types of ammunition except small arms since the late 1920s. These structures, called igloos because of their resemblance to Eskimo shelters, were shaped to direct the force of an explosion upward rather than outward to prevent sympathetic explosions in surrounding igloos. Thomson and Mayo, The Ordnance Department: Procurement and Supply, pp. 361 and 368; Iland, "Sierra Army Depot, Herlong, California," p. 12.

5. Construction of the Sierra, Navajo, Letterkenny, Sioux, Black Hills, Tooele, Blue Grass, and Pueblo depots was part of the Ordnance Department's program "B" which differed from that of the "A" depots begun in 1941 (Anniston, Umatilla, Portage, Wingate, Milan, Seneca, San Jacinto, and Red River) where permanent construction was predominant. Thomson and Mayo, The Ordnance Department: Procurement and Supply, p. 378.

6. Ibid., pp. 380-383.

Chapter 3

PRESERVATION RECOMMENDATIONS
BACKGROUND

Army Regulation 420-40 requires that an historic preservation plan be developed as an integral part of each installation's planning and long range maintenance and development scheduling. The purpose of such a program is to:

To meet these overall preservation objectives, the general preservation recommendations set forth below have been developed:

Category I Historic Properties

All Category I historic properties not currently listed on or nominated to the National Register of Historic Places are assumed to be eligible for nomination regardless of age. The following general preservation recommendations apply to these properties:

a) Each Category I historic property should be treated as if it were on the National Register, whether listed or not. Properties not currently listed should be nominated. Category I historic properties should not be altered or demolished. All work on such properties shall be performed in accordance with Sections 106 and 110(f) of the National Historic Preservation Act as amended in 1980, and the regulations of the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation (ACHP) as outlined in the "Protection of Historic and Cultural Properties" (36 CFR 800).

b) An individual preservation plan should be developed and put into effect for each Category r historic property. This plan should delineate the appropriate restoration or preservation program to be carried out for the property. It should include a maintenance and repair schedule and estimated initial and annual costs. The preservation plan should be approved by the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Advisory Council in accordance with the above referenced ACHP regulation. Until the historic preservation plan is put into effect, Category I historic properties should be maintained in accordance with the recommended approaches of the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Revised Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings and in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer.

c) Each Category I historic property should be documented in accordance with Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) Documentation Level II, and the documentation submitted for inclusion in the HABS/HAER collections in the Library of Congress. When no adequate architectural drawings exist for a Category I historic property, it should be documented in accordance with Documentation Level I of these standards. In cases where standard measured drawings are unable to record significant features of a property or technological process, interpretive drawings also should be prepared.

Category II Historic Properties

All Category II historic properties not currently listed on or nominated to the National Register of Historic Places are assumed to be eligible for nomination regardless of age. The following general preservation recommendations apply to these properties:

a) Each Category IT historic property should be treated as if it were on the National Register, whether listed or not. Properties not currently listed should be nominated. Category II historic properties should not be altered or demolished. All work on such properties shall be performed in accordance with Sections 106 and 110(f) of the National Historic Preservation Act as amended in 1980, and the regulations of the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation (ACHP) as outlined in the "Protection of Historic and Cultural Properties" (38 CFR 800).

b) An individual preservation plan should be developed and put into effect for each Category II historic property. This plan should delineate the appropriate preservation or rehabilitation program to be carried out for the property or for those parts of the property which contribute to its historical, architectural, or technological importance. It should include a maintenance and repair schedule and estimated initial and annual costs. The preservation plan should be approved by the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Advisory Council in accordance with the above referenced ACHP regulations. Until the historic preservation plan is put into effect, Category II historic properties should be maintained in accordance with the recommended approaches in the Secretary of the Interior 's 5 Standards for Rehabilitation and Revised Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings 4 and in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer.

c) Each Category II historic property should be documented in accordance with Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) Documentation Level II, and the documentation submitted for inclusion in the HABS/HAER collections in the Library of Congress. (5)

Category III Historic Properties

The following preservation recommendations apply to Category III historic properties:

a) Category Ill historic properties listed on or eligible for nomination to the National Register as part of a district or thematic group should be treated in accordance with Sections 106 and 110(f) of the National Historic Preservation Act as amended in 1980, and the regulations of the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation as outlined in the "Protection of Historic and Cultural Properties" (36 CFR 800). Such properties should not be demolished and their facades, or those parts of the property that contribute to the historical landscape, should be protected from major modifications.

Preservation plans should be developed for groupings of Category III historic properties within a district or thematic group. The scope of these plans should be limited to those parts of each property that contribute to the district or group's importance. Until such plans are put into effect, these properties should be maintained in accordance with the recommended approaches in the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Revised Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings and in consultation with the

State Historic Preservation Officer.

b) Category III historic properties not listed on or eligible for nomination to the National Register as part of a district or thematic group should receive routine maintenance. Such properties should not be demolished, and their facades, or those parts of the property that contribute to the historical landscape, should be protected

from modification. If the properties are unoccupied, they should, as a minimum, be maintained in stable condition and prevented from deteriorating. HABS/HAER Documentation Level IV has been completed for all Category III historic properties, and no additional documentation is required as long as they are not endangered. Category Ill historic properties that are endangered for operational or other reasons should be documented in accordance with HABS/HAER Documentation Level III, and submitted for inclusion in the HABS/HAER collections in the Library of Congress. Similar structures need only be documented once.

CATEGORY I HISTORIC PROPERTIES
There are no Category I historic properties at Sierra Army Depot.

CATEGORY II HISTORIC PROPERTIES
There are no Category II historic properties at Sierra Army Depot.

CATEGORY III HISTORIC PROPERTIES
There are no Category III historic properties at Sierra Army Depot.

NOTES

1. Army Regulation 420-40, Historic Preservation (Headquarters, U.S. Army: Washington, D.C., 15 April 1984).

2. National Park Service, Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Revised Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings, 1983 (Washington, D.C.: Preservation Assistance Division, National Park Service, 1983).

3. National Park Service, Archeology and Historic Preservation; Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines," Federal Register, Part IV, 28 September 1983, pp. 44730-44734.

4. National Park Service, Secretary of the Interior's Standards.

5. National Park Service, "Archeology and Historic Preservation."

6. National Park Service, Secretary of the Interior's Standards.

7. National Park Service, "Archeology and Historic Preservation."

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Challenge.